THUS 2020 program is postponed to summer 2021 due to COVID-19 pandemic.

THUS 2020 & 2021 projects

The main component of the summer program is an active participation in the selected hummanisites and social sciences research project offered by the staff members of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, please see the topics and their descriptions below. Interested students are welcome to contact possible advisors for more details concerning the foreseen projects and discuss the dates that the project could be undertaken.


ARCHEOLOGY and HISTORY

FINE ARTS (Decorative Arts and Conservation of Works of Art)

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

LINGUISTICS

PEDAGOGICS

POLITICAL SCIENCE (european studies, political systems)

PSYCHOLOGY (cogtnitive personality psychology)


ARCHEOLOGY and HISTORY

Explore Polish Mesolithic! Middle Stone Age communities of the Chełmno-Dobrzyń Lake District


The objective of the project is a multi-aspect analysis of early Holocene community of hunter-gatherers from Chełmno-Dobrzyń Lake District, taking into account the study of their daily lives, mobility, relationships with the surrounding environment and other regions of Europe. The fieldwork and laboratory research focus on the aggregation of sites located in the subglacial valley of Grodno and Plebanka lakes. The work aim to expand the current knowledge on Mesolithic economy, localization and functional organization of camps and principles governing their internal and external arrangement. The Project is important from many reasons. It is one of the few cases in which investigation of Mesolithic settlement includes, on such large scale, spatial analyses, with the use of information obtained through precise geodesic measurements and multi-faceted geomorphological, paleopedological, soil, hydrological, archeozoological, anthracological and palynlogical works. It allows for a comprehensive reconstruction of the natural environment of the region of the sites and their morphology in the moment of occupation by Mesolithic people. This data are correlated with the information provided by excavations and comprehensive analyzes of the prehistoric material (for example technology and traceology of the stone and bone artefacts). More information can be found at the web page of the project: www.searchingformesolithic.umk.pl
This year, the project will continue excavations at the unique site Paliwodzizna 29. Basic research tasks for this year:
  1. Completing the exploration of a cluster of unique ritual features (stone structures, e.g. large hearths and deep pits), possibly associated with a Mesolithic grave. This zone is a unique discovery on a European scale.
  2. Completing the exploration of a unique cluster of late Mesolithic materials (flints and bones), probably associated with shelter from this period.
  3. Further exploration of "wet" trenches (layers of peat and gyttia containing artefacts from organic raw materials).
  4. Drilling at the wetland (in cooperation with the University of Oslo) in order to obtain material for DNA analysis of plant materials (to reconstruct the natural environment and identify plants related to human presence in the Mesolithic).
  5. Technological and traceological studies of obtained flint products. The primary purpose of the latter is to identify artefacts for residues analysis (in cooperation with TraceoLab in Belgium).
Supervisor: Grzegorz Osipowicz (Grzegorz.Osipowicz[at]umk.pl)
Time: August 2021

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Amicitia, memoria, iustum negotium – the importance of long – distance trade and Medieval power networks (East Central and Northern Europe – 9th – 11th century)


The aim of the project is to describe the mechanisms leading to the creation of medieval power networks in the context of dynastic relationships, economic-political activity and in the view of memorative practice. The project is a continuation of research interests undertaken in the dissertation. An important questions to describe the economical consequences of conversion, memoria, political friendship and alliances between the Empire and Barbarian lands. The aim problem in proposed study is political-economic aspects of the inclusion of new territories to Ottonian power sphere. We can observe it in written sources and in some archeological data –like silver hoards. The Ottonian state was one of economical imbalances in the socio-economical changes (state creation processes) on the indicated area. From this point of view –the commercial exchange or economy -was as one of the kind of rules activity. We observe it especially in Danemark or in the First Piast’s state. These processes may be connected with the development of the monastic system of the Ottonian state and the simultaneous growth of the demand some categories of goods. The presented study shows the economic sphere of socio-ideological impact of the Empire on the Barbarian lands-in the light of settlement transformation and centralization of power (both in the case of First Piast’s state as well in the case of Denmark or Sweden). We can identify here also some analogies (relation between Empire, First Piast’s state and Pomerania).

Supervisor: Piotr Pranke (piotrpranke[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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Slavery and slave traders in Central and Northern Europe in the High Middle Ages


In the subject literature there is a present group of social models – and the vision of the world “after Rome” - related to the ‘classical’ division of the society. We can find a lot of typical information about social status, organisation of society – or the general information about the importance and organisation of trade - without description of complicated trade systems, the understanding of ‘merchant’s magic’ and information about the function of social networks in the Middle Ages.
Only sometimes we can find information about magical valorisation of the space, religious practice and the influence of the magical thinking to the spheres of this part of Medieval life. For this reason the popular image of the slavery in the Middle Ages is still related to the ancient history – and a kind of social imagination about a’large scale of the slave trade’. Often refers also to the vision of the “Roman traders”. While the term “slave” may seem relatively simple to define as “a person who lacks the personality, subjectivity and freedom,” even that definition should be clarified in the context of source analysis - to be understood and explained. The term freedom was defined in the locally prevailing laws - and in the captitularia - and was distinguished from other categories of un-free persons - such as prisoners, serfs or children.
A slave can usually be sold as property without attachment to specific pieces of land or any other kind of obligation. A slave, then, can be moved and sold by the owner as an inanimate object rather than a person. In general – everything can be interpreted as a true – but only under special conditions The primary question is which category of a slave in the Early Middle Ages could be sold, why the terminology – referred to the real status of slave was so important? What was the “daily” trade practice? How the religious practice, church law and magical sphere of trade rituals determined the sphere of slave trade – and social status of traders?
Sources mentioned slaves as mancipia, servi (or sometimes as slaves or ancilla, ancillae), famuli and captivi. Their subordination, function, and social status were defined and described by the use of Latin term “family” (familia Sclavorum, familia serviis, mancipioli, familia utrusque sexus etc). Only this general information shows that the problem of slavery is more complicated.
The used of mentioned terms can described the social effects of military action, the use of force and violence – or the information about personal freedom - or information about social – and public duties of this group. It is worth stressing, that this can pose a difficulty as, in some cases, terms used in one period – such as the Latin word servus, used for both ‘slaves’ and ‘serfs’– had different meanings in the different periods of the Middle Ages. For example - Isidor of Sevilla (“Slavery [servitus] is called such from the act of saving [servando]. Among the ancients, those who were saved in battle from death were called slaves [servi]. This is alone the most extreme of all evils, which for a freeman is the most grave of all punishments; for where freedom has perished, there all has perished with it”) - understood a definition of slavery in the other way as in the group of documents related to the commemoration practice and donates in the Carolingian and Ottonian period. The mentioned terms were seen in this period not only through the prism of the legacy of Roman law and Germanic customary laws – but also through the prism of church legislation in the Merovingian period.

Supervisor: Piotr Pranke (piotrpranke[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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A Priest as Master of the House. Lower Clergyman and their Households in Later Middle Ages (Central Europe, 14th-15th century)

The parson of Toruń often had visitors, such as fellow clergymen, city councilors and representatives of territorial power. The manse of Toruń was full of life. Therefore, when considering the place of medieval clergy in society, it is worth taking a closer look at the households of clergymen. Where did the priests live? How was life organized in the medieval manse? Who lived in the clergyman's household and what was the relationship between the house master and its residents? What guests visited the priest's house? How did the community houses of the poor clergy function? These questions concern not only everyday life, but also the social standing of the clergy. A clergyman at home was not only a priest, but also a host, roommate, landowner, employer, sometimes even an entrepreneur. The question of who a clergyman is in his own house makes it possible to address another question: who was he in the society?
The goal of the project is an analysis of Lower Clergyman and their Households in Later Middle Ages. It will include the diverse aspects of everyday and social life of the Clergymen. The issues are connected to the question of the place of the clergymen in medieval society. Some seminars are going to be organized with the students on the topic of the literature, different categories of sources, and certain aspects of the clergymen households operation. The seminars are going to have a form of a discussion on the issues and problems prepared by the students. The project also includes a visit in the State Archive in Toruń.
Project includes regular meetings with students about the literature of the subject, various categories of sources and individual aspects of the functioning of clergy houses. Meetings will take the form of a seminar with a discussion on issues developed independently. The project also includes a visit in the State Archive in Toruń.
Command of English is sufficient to participate in the program, however the knowledge of German and/or basics of Latin would be an additional asset.

Research tasks:
Supervisor: Marcin Sumowski (m.sumowski[at]umk.pl)
Time: July 2021

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FINE ARTS (Decorative Arts and Conservation of Works of Art.)

Identification of Synthetic Pigments and Dyes in Paints from palettes of Jerzy Duda-Gracz (1941-2004) - (supportive tool for identification of modern painting materials and authentication of contemporary paintings)


Aim of the project:
Identification of pigments, dyes and carriers and fillers in artistic paints from five palettes of Jerzy Duda-Gracz in order to establish methodology of their analyses and better scientific, objective authentication tools especially for the works offered on the art market as well as to enhance better conservation treatment designing for the future
Tasks:
Investigation of about 300 model samples of pure paints obtained from the studio of Jerzy Duda-Gracz using first XRF analyses in order to establish elemental composition, and following these measurements with the FTIR-ATR method to later recognize basic compounds and if possible identify individual substances basing on comparative studies of spectra with the ones accessible in libraries and with spectra of other model samples of pure modern paints investigated earlier in Cathedral of Modern and Contemporary Art. Preparation of cross-section of these samples using professional instrument for mounting and polishing of samples and further microscopic documentation in the ViS and UV-light of its microscopic morphology. If possible executing additionally on chosen samples Raman spectroscopy analyses to further identify pigments, dyes and fillers.

Supervisor: Mirosław Wachowiak (miroszwach[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

Towards a post-American World Order: Russia’s International Strategy


This project explores Russia’s international strategy aimed at revising world order and shaping it into a post-American model. The 2008 Georgia war and 2014 annexation of Crimea were recognized as a milestone in its new international conduct. President Putin elaborated key assumptions of the new policy in 2014 Valdai Club in his speech “New Rules in a New World Order”.
Russia’s activities on the international stage and the domestic driving forces are key for the programme. Research focuses on Russia’s view on world order, its place in the international politics; Moscow’s interests and implementation of the strategy of revising world order.
Key areas include:
Supervisor: Agnieszka Bryc (a.bryc[at]umk.pl)
Time: July or September 2021

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The status of contemporary cities in the international relations


Cities since their origin have been centres of political, social, cultural and organizational innovation. The city is probably the most important and innovative opus that appeared in the last ten thousand years. The phenomenon of the growing role of cities in international relations and their impact on countries is at the heart of the research problem of this project. The aim of the project is to determine the role and impact of selected European cities on countries, government authorities and their foreign policy and the shaping or creation of international law, in other words – the role and influence of these cities in the field of international relations. In order to reach the research objective of this project, the following research questions should be answered: In order to find these answers, it is necessary to examine the activity and status of the European cities through the prism of activities undertaken, among others, by the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe; Committee of the Regions of the European Union; city networks, such as one of the most important European city networks, i.e. Eurocities in Brussels as well as United Cities and Local Government based in Barcelona. The student will be able to choose European cities he/she wants to examine taking into account the above mentioned research objective and research questions. The recommended research methods include comparative analysis, interviews, formal and legal analysis (including analysis of various legally binding and non-binding documents) and critical analysis of relevant literature (international relations, international law, political science, city studies etc., which at the same time proves the interdisciplinary nature of the planned project). The dominant research field, however, is social sciences, discipline: political sciences and administration.
The project will consist of the following steps:
  1. Introduction to the issue
  2. Discussion on contemporary cities status in international relations
  3. Choosing cities or their networks to examine
  4. Research
  5. Preparing an essay and presentation on the chosen topic
  6. Giving the final presentation.
Supervisor: Agnieszka Szpak (aszpak[at]umk.pl)
Co-supervisors:Joanna Modrzyńska (jmod[at]umk.pl)
Time: July 2021

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LINGUISTICS

The application of experimental semiotics in research on pragmatics


Experimental semiotics – the study of "novel forms of communication which people develop when they cannot use pre-established communication" (Galantucci 2012) – has recently become arguably the most prolific experimental approach in language evolution research. In this project, we aim at evaluating the ways in which experimental-semiotic studies are relevant to the study of pragmatics. We will in particular look at some limitations of this approach – such as a tendency of studies to be confined to a (multiple-alternative) forced-choice designs, i.e. a "closed meaning space" – as well as the most promising further applications.
This project will build off our own work in experimental semiotics (e.g. Zlatev, Wacewicz, Żywiczyński 2018). It will also tie in with ongoing research at CLES, which will use its own resources synergistically with THUS to generate added value. For example, the THUS project members will participate in two research seminars with international collaborators of CLES/IMSErt:Evo, and will be invited to co-author a book chapter “Experimental semiotics and the evolution of pragmatics: a review” that has been invited from the editors of an edited volume on the evolution of pragmatics (in preparation for Routledge).

Work Plan
  1. Extended literature review
    Project members will perform a systematic literature review (SLR) on experimental semiotics, to identify extant studies in this paradigm, and then classify and summarise these studies, looking in particular for links to pragmatics.
  2. Discussion seminars and workshops
    Project members will take part in the weekly CLES/Evo seminars, where they will present and discuss their ongoing work.
    They will also take part in two dedicated workshops independently organised by CLES/Evo:
    • a kick-off meeting with an introduction to experimental semiotics
    • a 2-day hands-on workshop with dr R. Muehlenbernd (NAWA Ulam fellow at CLES NCU), who will instruct them in preparing online experiments with LabVanced software.
  3. Supervisor: Sławomir Wacewicz (wacewicz[at]umk.pl)
    Time: August 2021

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(Inter)national memes and jokes


The function of popular jokes functioning in oral communication, as well as humorous texts printed in the press and in special selections, has been largely taken over by the internet and memes – here understood as an image or video accompanied by a piece of humoristic text quickly spread on the web. Although the role of traditional narrative jokes and anecdotes has diminished, they are still present in traditional and electronic media.
Both memes and jokes are based on specific patterns, and the medium of the internet accelerates the internationalization. However, many patterns remain regional or national.
The first aim of the project is to reveal the most widespread and significant meme patterns and motives in the jokes on the basis of statistical data provided by the popular sites containing memes and jokes. Similar ranking lists will be prepared for Poland and the country of origin of project participants, and then their content will be verified in terms of internationalization: which schemes appear in other countries, e.g. Robert Downey Jr. memes, Scottish jokes, blonde jokes, and which are of national character, e.g. long-nosed (proboscis) monkey memes in Poland or lieutenant Rzhevskiy jokes in Russia.
On this basis, we will answer the questions regarding the second research goal – to compare the two lists and to determine the “degree of internationalization” of the humour in the given country. To fulfil this task we are also going to analyze the social reception of individual memes and jokes on the basis of the discourse that arises around them (articles in socio-cultural magazines, internet commentaries).

Research goals:
  1. To find and characterize the most widespread and significant meme patterns and joke motives.
  2. To compare the lists of most popular jokes and memes in the country(ies) in question and to determine the “degree of internationalization” of their humour.
  3. To analyse the social reception of individual memes and jokes on the basis of the discourse that arises around them (articles in socio-cultural magazines, internet commentaries)
Research tasks:
  1. Selection of the most significant sources containing memes and jokes in Poland and in the country(ies) of origin of the project participants.
  2. Analysis of the statistical of the selected sites and preparation of the lists of most popular meme patterns (top-20) and joke motives (top-10).
  3. Verification of individual national lists in terms of the national or international nature of patterns and motives.
  4. Analysis of social reception and discourse around humorous texts and memes in the country(ies) in question.
  5. The comparison of the “degree of internationalization” of the humour in the given country.
  6. Preparing the research report in a form of a presentation or an article. If the participants are interested in writing a co-authored article, which is more time-demanding, it could be finished after the end of the project.
Supervisor: Michał Głuszkowski (micglu[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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Social and language adaptation of minorities and immigrants in contemporary Poland


The main aim of the project is to determine and characterize the strategies of language and social adaptation of the chosen national group.
Since the status of minorities is granted only to those ethnic and national groups whose ancestors have lived in Poland for at least 100 years, their cases will be the subject of the analysis of long-term adaptation. In turn, immigrants, especially temporary ones, undertake actions aimed at linguistic and social adaptation in the short-term perspective.
Therefore, the most valuable in our research will be examples of nationalities represented both among minorities and immigrant groups, which enable us to characterize the relationships between old and new diaspora, too. Ukrainians have the largest percentage share among immigrants in the entire country and our region, and constitute the the second biggest minority. The participants of the project will be offered to focus on this nationality on the example of a selected community of wood production factory workers in Tuchola Forest (Bory Tucholskie, Kujawsko-Pomorskie voivodship).
The research will include, among others, the participation of students in sociolinguistic interviews. Basic knowledge of Ukrainian, Russian or Polish will be helpful, but the assistance of the project supervisor and the Polish student will also allow people who only speak English to participate fully in the project. It is also possible to choose a different immigrant-minority community according to the interests of the participants.
If the epidemic limitations (Covid-19) disrupt the field part of the project, it is possible to implement it on the basis of online interviews and materials from social media and press.

Research goals:
  1. Analysis of values and stances in the field of language and social adaptation of immigrant and minority communities.
  2. Characteristics of the factors determining their conscious activities (strategies) of adaptation.
  3. Comparison of the situation of small, relatively isolated community and all representatives of a given nationality in Poland.
Research tasks:
  1. Getting acquainted with the legal status of minorities and immigrants in Poland.
  2. Preliminary analysis of the possibilities to maintain cultural heritage and mother tongue.
  3. A query in social media and the press of the given minority group in terms of detecting attitudes towards the Polish language, bi- and multilingualism, contacts with Poles and family language policy.
  4. Selection of qualitative research methods and preparation of semi-structured interview scenarios.
  5. Interviews with the members of the chosen minority (immigrant group).
  6. Analysis of values and stances as well as strategies towards language and social integration with Polish society and the integration processes between old and new diaspora.
  7. Preparing of the report/final presentation of the project results. If the participants are interested, it is possible to prepare a co-authored publication after the end of the project.
    1. In case of covid-lockdown or other epidemic restrictions, the interviews will be conducted online or replaced with a survey and additional social media queries.
      Supervisor: Michał Głuszkowski (micglu[at]umk.pl)
      Time: Summer 2021

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The 2nd half of the 20th century in social memory


The beginning of the historical and political second half of the 20th century is slightly earlier than pure mathematics would suggest, because in 1945, when World War II ended. It is more difficult to precisely define its end, but it oscillates around 1989, when political changes began in Central and Eastern Europe and the Berlin Wall was demolished.
Thus, the second half of the 20th century, understood here as the years 1945-89, was associated with the division of Europe and the world into two military camps and two economic blocs. Normal life was going on both sides of the Iron Curtain, there were also events important for the region, individual towns and villages or families.
Our aim is to compare the picture of these events in the collective memory in Poland and the country(ies) of origin of the project participants. If these are the countries of the former socialist bloc, the end result will be a comparative study of the memory of communism, and in the case of students from Western countries – a comparison of events and phenomena living in collective memory in the then separated social realities.
The project will be based on a qualitative methodology. On the material of semi-structured interviews conducted (online) simultaneously by Polish and foreign project participants with their relatives or friends representing generations who remember the 2nd half of the 20th century from their own experience. The final analysis aims to compare the events reported as important by the informants with the most important points on the timeline according to historical studies.

Research goals
  1. To compare social memory about the 2nd half of the 20th century in Poland and the countries of origin of the project participants on the example of individual stories.
  2. To gain a different perspective on past events from the interviews by forcing the narrative about them to be directed to an external audience (a foreigner).
  3. To locate the events, which were significant in the lives of selected informants, on a timeline formed by "great history" events determined on the basis of official historical works.
Research tasks
  1. A query covering official historical works devoted to the period of the second half of the 20th century in order to determine the most important events in Poland and the countries of origin of the project participants.
  2. Selection of criteria that students should follow when selecting informants.
  3. Preparation of scenarios of the semi-structured interviews.
  4. Interviews with the selected informants. The interviews will be conducted by the student from the informant’s country with the participation of at least one other team member (or the supervisor). The presence of the foreigner and the questions asked by him/her (directly or translated) will encourage informants to formulate their thoughts more easily and to look at their own history from an external perspective, which will distinguish our project from numerous studies in the field of oral history.
  5. Analysis of the collected material in two stages: a) the national one, b) the international comparison.
  6. Work on the research report – a presentation or an article.
Supervisor: Michał Głuszkowski (micglu[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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PEDAGOGICS

What it's like to be a doctoral student in Poland? Doctoral Studies in the New Law on Higher Education and Science


In 2018 the new Law on Higher Education and Science was passed in Poland. It assumed that universities will introduce interdisciplinary doctoral schools (or colleges), based on each fields of science. Whether or not and what kind of doctoral school university could open, will depend on the scientific categories that the university receives in its disciplines (and following authorization to grant doctoral degree). The idea of autonomy and internal freedom, which was introduced by the Law 2.0, let each of the university to create its regime and structure of each doctoral school, based on the status of the university and main directions of the general law. It is occasion to discuss about the Polish reform of doctoral studies and see it from different perspectives, using scientific method e.g. discourse analysis, document analysis, each kind of surveys.
In the project it is worth to discuss a few research questions: How do the first new doctoral schools look like? What are their strong and weak points – both from the Ph.D. students' point of view, candidates, but also supervisors and university authorities? To what extent changing the form of doctoral education is important for the research process, relations with supervisors, finishing dissertation and defense of doctorate?

Supervisor: Anna Maria Kola (amkola[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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POLITICAL SCIENCE (european studies, political systems)

The EU Common Security and Defense Policy (CSDP) – selected aspects of Member States Engagement


The European Union's security architecture is currently co-created on several levels, by various decision-making centres. The countries themselves play a crucial role, so the first level is governmental. The second level is the cooperation of these countries on the supranational institutional level within the EU. The third is trans-Atlantic cooperation within the framework of a specialized international organization, NATO. Interestingly, analysis of the Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) in the current stage of development brings together all these three levels. The EU’s Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP), of which PESCO is a part, is not a military alliance, but rather a ‘post-national’ global security actor. Yet in security terms, it is hard to see how the EU as a post-national security actor differs fundamentally from other multilateral institutions designed to provide security and defence for a group of states through the promise of reciprocal military support (and some element of joint planning), whether for offensive or defensive purposes. CSDP members are looking for the same fundamental benefits from cooperation as members of other types of cooperative bodies, namely more security (conceived as greater capacity for action and greater credibility of promises, threats and deterrents) at a lower cost. However, cooperation related to the CSDP (Eilstrup-Sangiovanni, 2014) had not been carried out to the full extent. This situation has been changing significantly beginning in December 2017, when the EU Council decided to initiate permanent structured cooperation (PESCO) in the field of security and defence.

Supervisor: Michał Piechowicz (piechowicz[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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Women in politics


The project is aimed at answering the question of the position of women in politics. On the one hand the data on the position of women are going to be gathered and on the other the image on women in politics is going to be analyzed. On the basis of the gathered data the in-depth-interviews are going to be prepared, which are going to be conducted with women politicians from the students countries on their return home.
The aim of the project is:
  1. To gather some data on women in politics and women image in politics in different countries.
  2. To identify the trajectories of women paths into politics.
  3. To identify the barriers for women to enter the politics and difficulties they encounter while performing political functions.
Tasks in the project:
  1. Analysis of the position of women in politics in chosen countries using the method of secondary data analysis.
  2. Analysis of the image of women in politics in in chosen countries using the method of secondary data analysis
  3. Preparing under the supervision a tool for an in-depth-interview with women who achieved a position in politics.
  4. Conducting an interview with chosen women from the student’s country using that tool when the student returns to his/her country.
From participating in the project the students will learn (1) how to find, gather and analyze secondary data, (2) learn how to prepare the tool for the IDI, (3) how to find a respondent and (4) to conduct the interview(s).

Supervisor: Maria Wincławska (mariawin[at]umk.pl)
Time: July 2021

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PSYCHOLOGY (cogtnitive personality psychology)

Processing self-related information: investigation of structure and functions of self-knowledge


Goals of the project:
  1. To detect mechanisms underlying construction of valid self-knowledge.
  2. To confirm hypotheses about moderation and mediation of relationships between objectivity of self-knowledge and cognitive processes involved in its creation and / or processing.
  3. To track predictors of self-regulation related to the processing of self-related data
  4. To control cultural differences in the structure and function of accurate self-knowledge
Tasks in the project:
  1. To develop experimental procedures.
  2. To conduct experiments.
  3. To make your own report.
  4. To rate the narrative material (method of competent judges).
  5. To prepare and organize databases.
  6. To model data using structural equations (AMOS software).
  7. To process the results using the response surface analysis (RSA) method (R program).
  8. To prepare a report of the collected data, interpreting the results.
Supervisor: Łukasz Miciuk (miciuk[at]umk.pl)
Time: Summer 2021

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Sponsors: